Bougainvillea (Bougainvillea spectabilis)

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BOUGAINVILLEA

(Bougainvillea spectabilis)

BougainvillaBougainvillea Bush

The bugambilia or scientifically called the Bougainvilleas are popular ornamental plants in most areas with warm climates, including Ethiopia, Indonesia, Aruba, the Philippines, Thailand, Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Vietnam, Malaysia, Australia, Greece, Turkey, Cyprus, Singapore, the Mediterranean region, the Caribbean, Mexico, South Africa, Kuwait,the United Arab Emirates and the United States in Arizona, California, Florida, Hawaii, Louisiana, South Carolina, and southern Texas. Locarno in Switzerland, with its mild Mediterranean climate, is famous for its bougainvilleas.

Although it is frost-sensitive and hardy in U.S. Hardiness Zones 9b and 10, bougainvillea can be used as a houseplant or hanging basket in cooler climates. In the landscape, it makes an excellent hot season plant, and its drought tolerance makes bougainvillea ideal for warm climates year-round. Bougainvillea has a high salt tolerance, which makes it a natural choice for color on coastal regions. As a woody clambering vine, bougainvillea will stand alone and can be pruned into a standard, but it is perfect along fence lines, on walls, in containers and hanging baskets, and as a hedge or an accent plant. Its long arching branches are thorny, and bear heart-shaped leaves and masses of papery bracts in white, pink, orange, purple, and burgundy

Toxic Principle:
The sap of the Bougainvillea can cause skin rashes similar to poison oak/ivy. Avoid skin contact with the sap (and thorns). Flowers and leaves could be potentially dangerous to animals.

Poisoning Symptoms include:
Besides the dermological skin rashes that can occur, ingestion could bring nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. May be fatal.

SEE YOUR VET FOR TREATMENT OPTIONS
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 Lone Star English Setter Club provides this information
as a partial reference of the potential poisons that could harm your dog.
We are not veterinarian’s and DO NOT provide medical help.

 If you think that your animal is ill or may have ingested a poisonous substance,
contact your local veterinarian or
the ASPCA’s 24-hour emergency poisoning hotline directly

 1-888-426-4435