Chrysanthemum/Shasta Daisy (Chrysanthemum maximum)

CHRYSANTHEMUM/SHASTA DAISY
(Chrysanthemum maximum)
A.K.A.
ChrysanthsDaisy, Mum
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Chrysanthemum-Shasta-DaisyChrysanthemum Flowers

Modern cultivated chrysanthemums are showier than their wild relatives. The flower heads occur in various forms, and can be daisy-like or decorative, like pompons or buttons. This genus contains many hybrids and thousands of cultivars developed for horticultural purposes. In addition to the traditional yellow, other colors are available, such as white, purple, and red.

Distribution:
Chrysanthemums were first cultivated in China as a flowering herb as far back as the 15th century BC. Over 500 cultivars had been recorded by the year 1630. The plant is renowned as one of the Four Gentlemen in Chinese and East Asian art. The plant is particularly significant during theDouble Ninth Festival. The flower may have been brought to Japan in the eighth century AD, and the Emperor adopted the flower as his official seal. The “Festival of Happiness” in Japan celebrates the flower.

Chrysanthemums entered American horticulture in 1798 when Colonel John Stevens imported a cultivated variety known as ‘Dark Purple’ from England. The introduction was part of an effort to grow attractions within Elysian Fields in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Toxic Principle:
Sesquiterpene, lactones, pyrethrins and other potential irritants

Poisoning Symptoms include:
Vomiting, diarrhea, hyper-salivation, incoordination, dermatitis

CALL YOUR VET FOR TREATMENT OPTIONS
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Lone Star English Setter Club provides this information
as a partial reference of the potential poisons that could harm your dog.
We are not veterinarian’s and DO NOT provide medical help.

If you think that your animal is ill or may have ingested a poisonous substance,
contact your local veterinarian or
the ASPCA’s 24-hour emergency poisoning hotline directly

 1-888-426-4435