Croton (Euphorbiacea)

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CROTON
(Euphorbiacea)
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CrotonCroton Leaves and Flower
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(Euphorbiacea), is part of the Spurge family,  a large family of flowering plants with 300 genera and around 7,500 species. Most spurges are herbs, but some, especially in the tropics, are shrubs or trees. Some are succulent and resemble cacti.

Croton-RakotovaoCroton Rakotovao
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The leaves are alternate, seldom opposite, with stipules. They are mainly simple, but where compound, are always palmate, never pinnate. Stipules may be reduced to hairs, glands, or spines, or in succulent species are sometimes absent.

The radially symmetrical flowers are unisexual, with the male and the female flowers usually occurring on the same plant. As can be expected from such a large family, there is a wide variety in the structure of the flowers.C

Croton-argenteus-plantCroton Argenteus plant

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Distribution:
Found mainly in the tropics with the majority of the species in the Indo-Malayan region and tropical America a good second. A large variety occurs in tropical Africa, but they are not as abundant or varied as in these two other tropical regions. However, Euphorbia also has many species in nontropical areas such as the Mediterranean Basin, the Middle East, South Africa, and southern USA.

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Toxic Principle:
White Latex Sap
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Poisoning Symptoms include:
Irritating to the mouth and stomach, sometimes causing vomiting, but generally over-rated in toxicity..

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SEE YOUR VET FOR TREATMENT OPTIONS
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 Lone Star English Setter Club provides this information
as a partial reference of the potential poisons that could harm your dog.
We are not veterinarian’s and DO NOT provide medical help.

If you think that your animal is ill or may have ingested a poisonous substance,
contact your local veterinarian or
the ASPCA’s 24-hour emergency poisoning hotline directly

 1-888-426-4435