Mistletoe (Phorodentron Favescens)

MISTLETOE
(Phorodentron flavescens)
A.K.A.
American Mistletoe, Christmas Mistletoe, American and Oak Mistletoe
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MistletoeMistletoe 

Mistletoe is a woody parasitic shrubs with branches 3.9–31 in long, which grow on other deciduous trees. The foliage is dichotomously (dividing into two parts), with fairly large, 0.79–2.0 in long, opposite pairs of leaves; that are green. The plant relies of its host for some nutrients, although they are able to photosynthesize. By using a haustorium which grows into the stems of the host, the plant obtains its mineral and water needs, and some of its energy needs, from the host tree. The flowers are inconspicuous, greenish-yellow, 0.039–0.12 around. The fruit are white, yellow, orange, or red (when mature) that contain a very sticky juice where the seeds are embedded.

Distribution:
Native to the Americas, it can be found throughout the warm temperate and tropical regions.

Conditions of Poisoning:
Ingestion

Toxic Principle:
Toxalbumin, pharatoxin viscumin (Lectins, Phoratoxins)

Clinical Symptoms:
Reactions to ingestion of this plant can include: Gastrointestinal disorders, cardiovascular collapse, dyspnea, bradycardia, erratic behavior, blurred vision, nausea,  abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, blood pressure changes and even death.

IMMEDIATELY SEE YOUR VET FOR TREATMENT OPTIONS
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 Lone Star English Setter Club provides this information
as a partial reference of the potential poisons that could harm your dog.
We are not veterinarian’s and DO NOT provide medical help.

 If you think that your animal is ill or may have ingested a poisonous substance,
contact your local veterinarian or
the ASPCA’s 24-hour emergency poisoning hotline directly

 1-888-426-4435