Tansy (Tanacetum)

 

TANSY
(Tanacetum)
A.K.A
Common Tansy, Bitter Buttons, Cow Bitter, Mugwort, Golden Buttons
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Common-Tansy-FlowersCommon Tansy Flower Button
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Tansy is a flowering herbaceous plant with finely divided compound leaves and yellow, button-like flowers. It has a stout, somewhat reddish, erect stem, usually smooth, 50–150 cm tall, and branching near the top. The leaves are alternate, 10–15 cm long and are pinnately lobed, divided almost to the center into about seven pairs of segments, or lobes, which are again divided into smaller lobes having saw-toothed edges, giving the leaf a somewhat fernlike appearance. The roundish, flat-topped, button-like, yellow flower heads are produced in terminal clusters from mid-to-late summer. The scent is similar to that of camphor with hints of rosemary. The leaves and flowers are toxic if consumed in large quantities; the volatile oil contains toxic compounds including thujone, which can cause convulsions and liver and brain damage. Some insects, notably the tansy beetle Chrysolina graminis, have resistance to the toxins and subsist almost exclusively on the plant.

Common-TansyCommon Tansy flowers
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Distribution:
Tansy is a flowering plant of the aster family it is perennial and herbaceous, native to temperate Europe and Asia. It has been introduced to other parts of the world and in some areas has become invasive.
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Toxic Principle:
Pyrrolizidine alkaloids
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Poisoning Symptoms include:
The plant is not very palatable, but will be eaten by animals with no other forage; poisonings typically occur from ingestion of green plant material or material in hay. The toxic components can cause liver failure, referred to as “walking disease” or “sleepy staggers”. Signs include weight loss, weakness, sleepiness, yawning, incoordination, yellowish discoloration to mucous membranes (icterus), neurologic problems secondary to liver failure (aimless walking, chewing motions, head pressing). Animals may appear to be normal at first, then become suddenly affected; the syndrome progresses rapidly over a few days to a week. Liver damage, depression, anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, muddy mucous membranes, weakness, ataxia.


CALL YOUR VET IMMEDIATELY FOR TREATMENT OPTIONS
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 Lone Star English Setter Club provides this information
as a partial reference of the potential poisons that could harm your dog.
We are not veterinarian’s and DO NOT provide medical help.

If you think that your animal is ill or may have ingested a poisonous substance,
contact your local veterinarian or
the ASPCA’s 24-hour emergency poisoning hotline directly

 1-888-426-4435