Taro (calocasia)

 

TARO
(Calocasia)
A.K.A
Elephant’s ear, Calla lily , Caladium, Jack-in-the-pulpit, Cocoyam, Dasheen, Eddo,
Eddoe, Madumbe, Colocasie, Arum,

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Taro-PlantsTaro aka Elephant Ears
C

Taro is a common name for the corms and tubers of several plants in the Araceae family. Of these, Colocasia esculenta is the most widely cultivated and the subject of this article. More specifically, this article describes the “dasheen” form of taro; another variety of taro is known as eddoe.

TaroLeaf-CloseupTaro Leaf Closeup
Distribution:
Taro is native to South India and Southeast Asia. It is a perennial, tropical plant primarily grown as a root vegetable for its edible starchy corm, and as a leaf vegetable. It is a food staple in African, Oceanic and South Indian cultures and is believed to have been one of the earliest cultivated plants. Colocasia is thought to have originated in the Indo-Malayan region, perhaps in eastern India and Bangladesh, and spread eastward into Southeast Asia, eastern Asia, and the Pacific islands; westward to Egypt and the eastern Mediterranean; and then southward and westward from there into East Africa and West Africa, whence it spread to the Caribbean and Americas. It is known by many local names and often referred to as “elephant ears” when grown as an ornamental plant.
CaladiaumCaladiaum
C
Toxic Principle:
Insoluble calcium oxalates
C
Poisoning Symptoms include:
Oral irritation, intense burning and irritation of mouth, tongue and lips, excessive drooling, vomiting, difficulty swallowing.


CALL YOUR VET IMMEDIATELY FOR TREATMENT OPTIONS
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 Lone Star English Setter Club provides this information
as a partial reference of the potential poisons that could harm your dog.
We are not veterinarian’s and DO NOT provide medical help.

If you think that your animal is ill or may have ingested a poisonous substance,
contact your local veterinarian or
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