Trumpet Vine (Campsis)

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TRUMPET VINE
(Campsis)
A.K.A
Trumpet Creeper, Trumpet Flower, Cow Itch Vine and Hummingbird Vine
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C
TrumpetVineTrumpet Vine

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Trumpet vine or trumpet creeper, is a species of flowering plant of the family Bignoniaceae, native to the southeastern United States. Growing to 10 m (33 ft), it is a vigorous, deciduous woody vine, notable for its showy trumpet-shaped flowers. It inhabits woodlands and riverbanks, and is also a popular garden subject.The leaves are opposite, ovate, pinnate, 3–10 cm long, and emerald green when new, maturing into a dark green. The flowers come in terminal cymes of 4–12, orange to red in color with a yellowish throat, and generally appear after several months of warm weather.
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Trumpet-VineMature Trumpet Vine
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The flowers are very attractive to hummingbirds, and many types of birds like to nest in the dense foliage. The flowers are followed by large seed pods. As these mature, they dry and split. Hundreds of thin, brown, paper-like seeds are released. These are easily grown when stratified.
Trumpet-Vine-Seed-PodsTrumpet Vine Seed Pods
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Distribution:
The vigor of the trumpet vine should not be underestimated. In warm weather, it puts out huge numbers of tendrils that grab onto every available surface, and eventually expand into heavy woody stems several centimeters in diameter. It grows well on arbors, fences, telephone poles, and trees, although it may dismember them in the process. Ruthless pruning is recommended. Outside of its native range this species has the potential to be highly invasive, even as far north as New England. The trumpet vine thrives in many places in southern Canada as well.
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Toxic Principle:
Unidentified
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Poisoning Symptoms include:
Skin irritation with redness and swelling.


CONTACT YOUR VET FOR TREATMENT OPTIONS
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 Lone Star English Setter Club provides this information
as a partial reference of the potential poisons that could harm your dog.
We are not veterinarian’s and DO NOT provide medical help.

If you think that your animal is ill or may have ingested a poisonous substance,
contact your local veterinarian or
the ASPCA’s 24-hour emergency poisoning hotline directly

 1-888-426-4435

 

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